strict warning: Declaration of content_handler_field_multiple::pre_render() should be compatible with views_handler_field::pre_render(&$values) in /home/lindsayseers/lindsayseers.info/public/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/cck/includes/views/handlers/content_handler_field_multiple.inc on line 322.

'Altermodern' review: 'The richest and most generous Tate Triennial yet'

Author: 
Adrian Searle
Source publication: 
The Guardian
Press date: 
Feb 2009

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/feb/02/altermodern-tate-triennial

[Extract] Which brings me to Lindsay Seers's Extramission 6 (Black Maria), one of the real finds of this exhibition. Seers shows a semi-autobiographical, quasi-documentary film about her life, screened in a mock-up shed whose design is a copy of Thomas Edison's Black Maria, his New Jersey film studio. The story is implausible, troubling, and beautifully told by different narrators.

As a child, Seers is so overwhelmed by visual stimulus that she cannot speak. As soon as she sees a photograph, she decides she wants to be a camera. She uses her mouth as the camera, and goes about with a black bag over her head. As she grows up, Seers stops being a camera, and wants instead to be a projector. She wears a model of Edison's studio on her head, projecting the movies in her mind. She struggles to illuminate the world.

The whole story is both dreamlike and moving. How much of it is true? There are interviews with Seers's mother and with a psychologist. Are they really who we think they are? As I staggered out, someone muttered "What is she on?"