• strict warning: Declaration of views_attach_plugin_display_node_content::options_submit() should be compatible with views_plugin_display::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/all/modules/views_attach/views_attach_plugin_display_node_content.inc on line 248.
  • strict warning: Declaration of content_handler_field_multiple::pre_render() should be compatible with views_handler_field::pre_render(&$values) in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/cck/includes/views/handlers/content_handler_field_multiple.inc on line 322.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/views_galleriffic/views_galleriffic.module on line 75.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/views_galleriffic/views_galleriffic.module on line 79.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/views_galleriffic/views_galleriffic.module on line 75.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/views_galleriffic/views_galleriffic.module on line 79.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/views_galleriffic/views_galleriffic.module on line 75.
  • warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/lindsayseers/public_html/sites/seers-dev.dev.freewayprojects.com/modules/views_galleriffic/views_galleriffic.module on line 79.
Coupling | 1995

Coupling

8m digital print on laminated paper

Family photographs are probably far less printed now and remain as screen based images but those that reach further back in time, and have been printed, may languish in albums and old biscuit tins in cupboards but they do not rest in a fixed stasis, but they change with us. Their relevance shifts as the pictured accrue more narrative and different contexts.

It is not unusual to find photographs with faces blotted out or cut away. Sometimes no-one can identify who an old image is even of anymore - the knowledge is lost and a certain melancholy pervades over this fact of a person who has no-one to even recall them in memory, it seems they are lost to time despite the inevitable intensity of having lived, nothing remains but an image. 

Somehow these images shape us. Sifting through one can see a likeness across the family and life stories share tendencies which can echo on down generations. It is difficult to really know what is heritable in us but we only have to spend some time with particular relatives to see odd traits of our own being enacted by them.

In this work Coupling the artist was fascinated by a photograph she had long believed to be of her brother but which turned out to be of her father. She had a very similarly formatted photograph of herself taken when she was at a similar age to her father, they seemed like non-identical twins. What fascinated her was this realm of the photograph where she could consider and feel her father as the same age as her, breaking down her perception of him as always being 'in advance of her'. The two children (father and daughter) are laid out in the work as identical twins (the reproducible nature of photography) and she adds distortion to the mix giving the image an impression of speed but also making it answerable to space. As one moves around the extremely elongated work it bends and foreshortens. The children are accompanied by parents - an image of a wedding couple. How do these images sit in time? Are the children the couple or are they the offspring of the married man and woman?

Seers attempts to make visible the shifting nature of the printed photo in physical space - always interested in embodiment, this work allows the viewer to consider what is being presented in differing spatial and psychological positions that refute the tendency of the photograph to empty out time, by enforcing new temporalities that in their most simple form are created by a physical and visible elongation.